Select Page
Raspberry Pi NAS for Travelers

Raspberry Pi NAS for Travelers

Say you have some type of home NAS or drive array which houses valuable information. And let’s say you want to go traveling for a while (as I plan to do), but leave the box in storage. What’s the best way to bring your data with you, or just a bunch of free space for projects? For most, ditching the drive in your laptop for something which has more capacity is good enough. But what if you wanted to maintain some level of redundancy for your data? In my case, I was coming from a 3 x 1TB drive configuration in RAID 5 with battery backed write cache (Dell PERC 5/i), running Openfiler with NFS and SMB. The answer, of course, is Raspberry Pi. Obviously the trade off is a drastic decrease in speed, but more than worth the effort to put this little setup together. Also, due to the CPU overhead and complexity, I didn’t want to bother with software RAID and decided instead to use lsyncd. The kit includes: 1 x Raspberry Pi 1 x Adafruit Pi case 2 x Seagate Slim Traveler 2TB USB drive 1 x Pluggable 4 port USB hub 1 x PowerGen 2.4-Amp USB wall charger Raspberry Pi alone doesn’t supply enough power for both drives, or even one for that matter. The powered USB hub is necessary for reliable operation of both drives. Before we begin, we’ll need to install a few packages. root@raspberrypi:/# apt-get install sysstat ntfs-3g lsyncd bc Then make sure lsyncd starts on boot: root@raspberrypi:/# update-rc.d lsyncd defaults When working with a large directory structure as I was, upping the number of inotify watches was...

A Review of Seven Shortcuts to Taking Amazing Photos

My apologies to Tommy – this post was somehow lost. Please be patient as I go through the backups… Found the backup. Need to restore it better. ‘\r\n\r\nHaving spent less than $500 on lenses for my Nikon D3100 with no prior experience, I\’ll use all the advice I can get when it comes to photography.\r\n\r\nMy friend, Tommy Schultz, whose work has been featured in publications such as Patagonia and the National Geographic, just created a video series to show you the best ways to capture light in the most common scenarios. Just look at his portfolio.\r\n\r\nFor the amateur, these videos provide tips and techniques for standard situations, leaving you with a professional\’s take on some of the best ways to shoot your most important and memorable photos.\r\n\r\nI purchased the series, which consists of seven topics.\r\n 1.  How to Bring Back the Beach with Your Camera \r\nIn these situations, light is more intense and often doesn\’t meet the camera the same as it does for what you actually see. This video provides a number of great tips for capturing bright light situations, including the most ideal filter to use, allowing you to bring back the true color and essence of the photo that you\’re after. The examples in this video are most impressive.\r\n 2.  How to Capture Amazing Sunset Photos \r\nTommy highlights common reasons most sunset photos fail, which is a result of either overexposure of the scene, or underexposure. He presents two solutions: high dynamic range (HDR) photography, or use of a graduated neutral density filter. Tommy explains his method for using this filter in order to produce dramatic...
Private VLANs w/ VMware vDS and Cisco Nexus 5000: A Configuration Reference

Private VLANs w/ VMware vDS and Cisco Nexus 5000: A Configuration Reference

When configuring the networks of a virtualized environment, private VLANs expand the functionality of a standard VLAN.  This article describes the configuration of PVLANs from both the VMware and Cisco perspectives.  The purpose of this article is to provide a brief configuration overview.  It’s likely you already know what PVLANs are and how they work, so I won’t go into much detail there.  For more information about VLANs and PVLANs, check out Cisco’s Securing Networks with Private VLANs and VLAN Access Control Lists. Usage Scenarios DMZ security – Servers running in a DMZ can be isolated from one another. Should a DMZ guest be compromised, the guest is unable to communicate with any other guest in the the DMZ (given each are a part of an isolated PVLAN) Hosted cloud infrastructure – A customer environment (consisting of multiple guests) in a community PVLAN are able to communicate amongst themselves, but cannot communicate with a different community PVLAN Overcome standard VLAN limitations – While PVLANs exist with their own set of limitations, private VLANs greatly extend the functionality and usefulness of a standard VLAN Configuration Overview vlan 2410 int: 192.168.7.1 (primary 2410, secondary 2411) vlan 2412 int: 192.168.8.1 (primary 2412, secondary 2413) vlan 2411 – isolated vlan 2413 – community bperove-vm1: 192.168.7.10 – dvPortGroup1 – primary 2410, secondary 2411 bperove-vm2: 192.168.7.11 – dvPortGroup1 – primary 2410, secondary 2411 bperove-vm3: 192.168.8.10 – dvPortGroup2 – primary 2412, secondary 2413 bperove-vm4: 192.168.8.11 – dvPortGroup2 – primary 2412, secondary 2413 bperove-vm5: 192.168.8.12 – dvPortGroup2 – primary 2412, secondary 2413 bperove-vm6: 192.168.8.13 – dvPortGroup3 – primary 2412, secondary 2412 Configuration of VMware vDS (DVS) dvSwitch...

Bullet-proof Apache: Nikto Security Scanner

If you’ve ever been responsible for maintaining an Apache web server, you know how important security is. Nikto provides an easy way to scan for known (and unknown) vulnerabilities within your Apache server.  Actually, it does a fairly comprehensive scan on over 200 web servers, not just Apache.  To run a security scan, download the tool, then extract the archive to the desired location.  To initiate a scan from the Nikto directory, type: [code] ./nikto.pl -host [ip address] [/code] Note: when specifying an IP address, make sure you use the external IP of your webserver, not the internal IP. Here is what my results look like: [code] – Nikto v2.03/2.04 ————————————————————————— + Target IP:          10.0.0.1 + Target Hostname:    blurred for security + Target Port:        80 + Start Time:         2009-01-26 16:44:36 ————————————————————————— + Server: Apache + OSVDB-3092: GET /manual/ : Web server manual found. + OSVDB-3268: GET /manual/images/ : Directory indexing is enabled: /manual/images + OSVDB-3233: GET /icons/README : Apache default file found. + 3577 items checked: 3 item(s) reported on remote host + End Time:        2009-01-26 16:45:25 (49 seconds) ————————————————————————— + 1 host(s) tested Test Options: -host 10.0.0.1 ————————————————————————— [/code] I would then look up the results and fix each issue until there have been no issues detected.  See the OSVDB-ID?  These IDs are found in the Open Source Vulnerability Database.  Each ID will contain a description, classification, and solution. To aid in your research, I have created an OSVDB Firefox search plugin.  Install the plugin and then search for 3092, 3268, 3233, etc. Hopefully this makes securing your web server quick & painless. About Benjamin PeroveBen has been...

Find Linux CPU Temperature

The easiest way to get a CPU temperature readout from Linux is by looking at an ACPI function called temperature: [code] cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature [/code] You could also try sensors-detect and then sensors, but I had some trouble detecting the correct modules on 8 year old hardware. About Benjamin PeroveBen has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises professionally since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Medellin,...

Dual-Boot a Sansa e260 with Sandisk OG and Rockbox

Hi, thanks for reading. I’m a friend of Ben’s and he’s letting me put down this post. I run a small electronic music blog at astropope.com. If you have seen the post about how to boost wordpress audio with Amazon S3, then you know we are the guinea pigs to test a new breed of online music blogging. Pompous? Maybe. Fun? Yes. If you like music as much as we do, you probably want to be wearing it around your neck 24/7. In my case, you want it to listen to on your public transportation commute to work. Right? Or you’re having a hard time transporting 100+ gigs of music to your FreeBSD workstation. I know the feeling. In this article, I am going to show how to set up your Sansa e260 as a “dual boot” with Sandisk’s original firmware and the Rockbox software. I am not an expert on the technical differences between MSC or MTP, but in order to install the Rockbox software, you MUST have your Sansa in MSC mode. In Sansa’s original operating software, you will need to navigate to the “Settings” part of the wheel menu. Within there, you will find an option to switch between MCP and MTP. Many Google searches will give you quite intoxicating information of the minute details of both protocols. The first thing it would be nice for you to do is update the firmware (since mine was refurbished, I had to update the firmware). Download the firmware updater and install it. I cannot always guarantee the accuracy of that link, but if it ever goes down, go...