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Bullet-proof Apache: Nikto Security Scanner

If you’ve ever been responsible for maintaining an Apache web server, you know how important security is. Nikto provides an easy way to scan for known (and unknown) vulnerabilities within your Apache server.  Actually, it does a fairly comprehensive scan on over 200 web servers, not just Apache.  To run a security scan, download the tool, then extract the archive to the desired location.  To initiate a scan from the Nikto directory, type: [code] ./nikto.pl -host [ip address] [/code] Note: when specifying an IP address, make sure you use the external IP of your webserver, not the internal IP. Here is what my results look like: [code] – Nikto v2.03/2.04 ————————————————————————— + Target IP:          10.0.0.1 + Target Hostname:    blurred for security + Target Port:        80 + Start Time:         2009-01-26 16:44:36 ————————————————————————— + Server: Apache + OSVDB-3092: GET /manual/ : Web server manual found. + OSVDB-3268: GET /manual/images/ : Directory indexing is enabled: /manual/images + OSVDB-3233: GET /icons/README : Apache default file found. + 3577 items checked: 3 item(s) reported on remote host + End Time:        2009-01-26 16:45:25 (49 seconds) ————————————————————————— + 1 host(s) tested Test Options: -host 10.0.0.1 ————————————————————————— [/code] I would then look up the results and fix each issue until there have been no issues detected.  See the OSVDB-ID?  These IDs are found in the Open Source Vulnerability Database.  Each ID will contain a description, classification, and solution. To aid in your research, I have created an OSVDB Firefox search plugin.  Install the plugin and then search for 3092, 3268, 3233, etc. Hopefully this makes securing your web server quick & painless. About Benjamin PeroveBen has been...

Find Linux CPU Temperature

The easiest way to get a CPU temperature readout from Linux is by looking at an ACPI function called temperature: [code] cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature [/code] You could also try sensors-detect and then sensors, but I had some trouble detecting the correct modules on 8 year old hardware. About Benjamin PeroveBen has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises professionally since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Medellin,...

uTrack Mobile Application

Trendy name aside, the uTrack mobile application is entirely responsible for my recent disappearance. Find out more about uTrack. About Benjamin PeroveBen has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises professionally since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Medellin,...

Dual-Boot a Sansa e260 with Sandisk OG and Rockbox

Hi, thanks for reading. I’m a friend of Ben’s and he’s letting me put down this post. I run a small electronic music blog at astropope.com. If you have seen the post about how to boost wordpress audio with Amazon S3, then you know we are the guinea pigs to test a new breed of online music blogging. Pompous? Maybe. Fun? Yes. If you like music as much as we do, you probably want to be wearing it around your neck 24/7. In my case, you want it to listen to on your public transportation commute to work. Right? Or you’re having a hard time transporting 100+ gigs of music to your FreeBSD workstation. I know the feeling. In this article, I am going to show how to set up your Sansa e260 as a “dual boot” with Sandisk’s original firmware and the Rockbox software. I am not an expert on the technical differences between MSC or MTP, but in order to install the Rockbox software, you MUST have your Sansa in MSC mode. In Sansa’s original operating software, you will need to navigate to the “Settings” part of the wheel menu. Within there, you will find an option to switch between MCP and MTP. Many Google searches will give you quite intoxicating information of the minute details of both protocols. The first thing it would be nice for you to do is update the firmware (since mine was refurbished, I had to update the firmware). Download the firmware updater and install it. I cannot always guarantee the accuracy of that link, but if it ever goes down, go...