Archive for June, 2007

Uninstall Windows Messenger

Windows Messenger always seems to find its way into your system tray one way or another. Remove it once and for all by editing:

c:\windows\inf\sysoc.inf

Look for the line with msmsg and near the end, remove HIDE so the commas have nothing in between. You will then be able to uninstall the program from Add/Remove Programs in the control panel, under Windows Components.

See ya.

 

About Benjamin Perove

Ben has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Remove the Language Toolbar

Tired of the language toolbar always showing up on the taskbar? Remove it permanently by unregistering a DLL. From a command prompt, type:

[code]regsvr32 /u msutb.dll[/code]

Adios.

 

About Benjamin Perove

Ben has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Reset the TCP/IP Stack

It’s impossible to uninstall TCP/IP from a Windows operating system. When troubleshooting network issues, sometimes it is best to restore the TCP/IP stack to its original state that existed when the operating system was first installed.

From a command prompt, execute:

[code]netsh int ip reset logfilename.txt[/code]

…where logfilename is specified for obvious reasons.

Severe flakiness has led me to eventually reset the stack. For instance, one second you can ping Google, the next second you time out. Only small parts of web pages load. DNS has a fit.

The TCP/IP stack is equivalent to Winsock from back in the day. Why does this happen? There are many reasons, but most commonly, data that resides on your hard disk is subject to corruption as a result of bad sectors/data loss and deteriorating drive health. Sometimes your registry and networking files reside on bad spots of the disk, thus Windows becomes sluggish, unresponsive, and things eventually stop working.

Additional resources and information are available at Microsoft.

 

About Benjamin Perove

Ben has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Upgrade FC6 to Fedora 7

As of May 31st, Fedora 7 is available. Even though the project has dropped ‘Core’ from its name, strangely enough the package names still includefc7′. To upgrade from FC6, you can follow these instructions:

  1. Make sure your system is up-to-date, and do a yum clean all for a little housekeeping.
  2. Install fedora release information as follows:
  3. [code lang="bash"]rpm -Uvh
    ftp://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/releases/7/Fedora/i386/os/Fedora/fedora-release-7-3.noarch.rpm
    ftp://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/releases/7/Fedora/i386/os/Fedora/fedora-release-notes-7.0.0-1.noarch.rpm[/code]

  4. If you have yumex installed, open it. Yumex will gather new package information, install/remove, resolve dependencies, etc. Otherwise, initiate yum -y update from the command line.

When performing the upgrade process on my server, it retrieved 2171 packages — about 1.2 gigs. There was a failed dependency with totem, so I removed it because I won’t be using totem on a server.

 

About Benjamin Perove

Ben has been associated with a broad spectrum of technologies starting from an early age, and he's contributed to the success of many businesses and enterprises since 2001. Most of his time is spent building cool stuff. When he's not working, he enjoys reading, playing acoustic guitar, and being with friends. He currently resides in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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